Caricatures and Humor

 Thumbnail CreatorDateTitle / Author / Date Price  Description
399Coming Soon!DetailsBarker, Matthew Henry1826
Greenwich Hospital
Barker, Matthew Henry
1826
$460.00Barker--Matthew-HenryGreenwich-HospitalCollection of humorous nautical tales written by Matthew Barker and illustrated by George Cruikshank. Eleven etched plates and sixteen text woodcuts. Marbeled boards. London: James Robins and Co., 1826
508Coming Soon!DetailsCruikshank, George1835
The Sailors Progress
Cruikshank, George
1835
$165.00Cruikshank--GeorgeThe-Sailors-ProgressNaval-themed frontispiece to a series of eight British naval caricature engravings by George Cruikshank depicting the life of Master Blockhead. Copperplate etching published by Thomas McLean, 26 Haymarket, London. August 1, 1835. Printed on an 11"x17" sheet of heavy wove paper the etching measure 5" by 7".
473Coming Soon!DetailsGillray, James1851
End of the Irish Invasion
Gillray, James
1851
$195.00Gillray--JamesEnd-of-the-Irish-InvasionRe-strike satirical copperplate engraving from the original plate by one of England's finest 18th century artists and satirists, James Gillray. This engraving by James Gillray reflects the fear of invasion from France at the end of the 18th century, just a few years after the French revolution. The prospect of invasion by sea has threatened the British Isles several times beginning in Roman times, notably during the "Invincible Armada" sent by Spain in 1588. <BR> </BR> The New York Public Library website explains the plate: <dir class="indenttextblock">"From the beginning of the conflict with France, the British feared a French invasion. In October 1796, the King warned against such a threat, which was dismissed by the Opposition as a fantasy. However, on December 15, 1796, a French force of 15,000 troops with an armada of ships, led by General Lazare Hoche, sailed from Brest and anchored in Bantry Bay off southern Ireland, assuming that their invasion would prompt a popular uprising against the British. Like the Spanish Armada two hundred years before, this plan was undone primarily by stormy weather. The winds in Gillray’s version emanate from (left to right) the mouths of Prime Minister Pitt, Secretary of War Henry Dundas, Foreign Secretary William Wyndham Grenville, and War Minister William Windham. One ship, Le Révolutionare with a Fox figurehead, is tossed by wind and waves, the L’Egalité is swamped, and the Whigs aboard The Revolutionary Jolly Boat appear doomed."</dir> <BR> Source: New York Public Library. Print Collection. No. 49.<BR> </BR> Originally published in 1797 by Hannah Humphrey this plate is from the Henry Bohn restrikes printed from the original plates during 1845 to 1851. Printed on both sides of heavy wove paper, the other side contains another fine engraving by Gillray titled "The Lion's Share".
474Coming Soon!DetailsGillray, James1851
The Hero of the Nile
Gillray, James
1851
$245.00Gillray--JamesThe-Hero-of-the-NileRe-strike caricature copperplate engraving from the original plate, by one of England's finest 18th century artists and satirists, James Gillray. Gillray's topic in this plate, first published in 1798, is one of Britain's naval heros, Admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805). <BR> </BR> Today, without an explanation many readers would not realize that this engraving is a caricature of Nelson, generally considered to be a great naval leader. The Greenwich Royal Museum explains Gillray's point of view:<i> " In contrast to other unquestioningly adulatory prints of Nelson’s victory at the Battle of the Nile, Gillray here sardonically points to the very large material rewards heaped upon Nelson as a result. Burlesquing the genre of heroic portraiture, he presents Nelson in solitary full-length, on deck and enveloped in smoke. Gillray draws attention to the diamond chelengk in Nelson’s hat, presented to him by the Sultan of Turkey, and in the adapted coat of arms below the main image satirizes his recent baronetcy. In November Nelson was created Baron Nelson of the Nile and Burnham Thorpe and was awarded a pension of £2000 a year. Gillray substitutes for the correct arms on the original shield a bulging purse and scroll inscribed ‘£2000 pr Ann’. Placed alongside Nelson’s motto ‘Palmam qui meruit ferat’ (Let he who has earned it bear the Palm), Gillray undermines the motto’s meaning, to question whether such a large material reward really is merited.</i><BR> Source: National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London.Collections. <BR> </BR> Originally published in 1798 this plate is a restrike by Henry Bohn printed from the original plates during 1845 to 1851. Printed on both sides of heavy wove paper, the other side contains another engraving, a biting satire by Gillray titled "Destruction of the French Collossus". Plate 211.
475Coming Soon!DetailsGillray, James1851
St. George and the Dragon
Gillray, James
1851
$500.00Gillray--JamesSt--George-and-the-DragonSpectacular re-strike caricature copperplate engraving from the original plate, by one of England's finest 18th century artists and satirists, James Gillray. The quality of engraving and the dark impression, along with Gillray's composition, and large size make this a very striking and attractive work. <BR> </BR> The scene depicts the royal St. George (King George III) rescuing Britannia from the fangs of the Monster of France (Naploeon). The king wears the uniform of his own regiment of Guards (the Blues). <BR> Source: Wright, Thomas and Robert Harding. "Historical and Descriptive Account of the Caricatures of James Gillray" Google Books. P.242 <BR> </BR> Originally published in 1805 this plate is a restrike by Henry Bohn printed from the original plates during 1845 to 1851. Printed on both sides of heavy wove paper, the other side contains another engraving, a satire by Gillray titled "The end of the farce of Catholic Emancipation".
1054Coming Soon!DetailsGillray, James1851
Fighting for the Dunghill
Gillray, James
1851
$450.00Gillray--JamesFighting-for-the-DunghillRe-strike satirical copperplate engraving of Gillray's famed "Fighting over the Dunghill". This caricature is by one of England's finest 18th century artists and satirists, James Gillray. Printed after Gillray's death from the original plate this engraving (recto) shows two colossal national figures sitting on the globe, Jack Tar, plump and hearty representing Britain, boxing an emaciated, half-naked Frenchman, possibly Napoleon, who has blood spouting from his nose, his torso and limbs heavily scarred with the tattooed name "Nelson", a British naval hero. <br></br> Hand-coloured etching with aquatint and attractive hand-coloring. <br></br> Originally published in 1798 by Hannah Humphrey this plate is from the Henry Bohn restrikes printed from the original plates during 1845 to 1851. Printed on both sides of heavy wove paper, the verso contains an unusable engraving due to trimming of the engraving on the recto.