India

 Thumbnail CreatorDateTitle / Author / Date Price  Description
115Coming Soon!DetailsThevet, Andre1575
Palimbotre
Thevet, Andre
1575
$150.00Thevet--AndrePalimbotreAttractive antique woodblock engraving by Andre Thevet of a perhaps mythical island 'Palimbotre' that he places south of the Ganges River in the Bay of Bengal. About Palimbotre Thevet writes " in this island most of the inhabitants idolize and respect their idols which are made of decorous ebony, where their neighbors of the continent fashion them from marble, stone, sandalwood and other materials" (Conley, Tom. P. 195).<BR> </BR> Thevet, born around 1516, became a Franciscan friar and wrote extensively about his travels in both the old world and new, widely embellishing the stories and images with myth and fiction.
894Coming Soon!DetailsCoronelli, Vincenzo1696
Coronelli's globe gore of the Arabian Sea, India and Maldive Islands
Coronelli, Vincenzo
1696
$480.00Coronelli--VincenzoCoronelli-s-globe-gore-of-the-Arabian-Sea--India-and-Maldive-IslandsUnusual antique hand-colored <b>globe gore</b> by cartographer and Franciscan monk Vincenzo Coronelli (1650 - 1718). Originally produced for <b>Coronelli's 1688 terrestrial globe</b>. This fine engraved gore was included inset with text in his famous island book or "Isolario" published from Venice in 1696 - 1697. <br></br> Ranging from Oman, Dubai, and Abu Dhabi, past the Strait of Hormuz and then trending southeast across Iran, Pakistan and the west coast of India this scarce cartographic curiosity includes the Maldive Islands ("Isole Maldive" ) and west coast of Sri Lanka. Among the many noted towns and villages in India are Mumbai ("Bombaim"), <b>Hyderabad ("Golconda")</b> , and Madurai ("Madura"). <br></br> A globe gore is a 2 dimensional representation on flat paper of a curved segment of the earth's surface. The gores are characterized by their curved top, bottom, and sides. Each gore would have been carefully cut to size and then pasted on a blank globe to produce a finished globe which would have been colored. Typically 12 gores were required to complete the 360 degree circumference of the earth at the latitudes covered by the gore. <br></br> We estimate a globe created with this gore would have had a circumference of about 11 feet. (The gore covers roughtly 30 degrees of longitude or 1/12 of the earths circumference. At the equator, this gore is 11" wide giving us 11" x 12 = 132" circumference or 11 feet.) <br></br> Text on both the recto and verso is Italian. Page 113.
1116Coming Soon!DetailsAa, Pieter van der1713
Antique map of North India or The Empire of the Grand Mogol
Aa, Pieter van der
1713
$250.00Aa--Pieter-van-derAntique-map-of-North-India-or-The-Empire-of-the-Grand-MogolAttractive antique map by Peter van der Aa of India, the Empire of the Grand Mogol, with the frontiers of Persia and Tartary after the memoires of Nuno de Cunha . Nunho de Cunha, the son of famed Portugese explorer Tristão da Cunha, was the ninth governor of Portuguese possessions in India from 1528 to 1538. <br></br> Extends across northern India with parts of Pakistan and Afghanistan. Includes the Indian states of Gujarat ("Guzaratte"), Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, and Haryana as well as numerous tributaries to the Ganges and Indus rivers. Key cites noted on the map include Dehli ("Deli"), Ahmedabad ("Hamedebat"), Kabul ("Cabul"), Lahore, Attock, Parvan, Campion, Pitan and numerous others. The map is printed into a finely-engraved decorative frame and will make a handsome presentation when framed. <br></br> Pieter van der Aa (1659 - 1733) was a Dutch publisher working in Leiden during the early eighteenth century. He is best known for publishing maps and atlases, though he also printed pirated editions of foreign bestsellers and illustrated volumes. Van de AA's use of stock mock-frame borders is a characteristic for which he is well known. This map shows evidence of two plate marks, one for the mock-frame and the second interior platemark for the smaller map which was printed inside the mock-frame. From "Le nouveau theatre du monde. ou La geographie royale, composée de nouvelles cartes tres-exactes", published from Leiden in 1713.
1173Coming Soon!DetailsAnville, Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d'1753
Antique Chart of The Coromandel Coast of India
Anville, Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d'
1753
$300.00Anville--Jean-Baptiste-Bourguignon-d-Antique-Chart-of-The-Coromandel-Coast-of-IndiaFine large antique French sea chart of India's Coromandel coast, the southeastern coastal region of the Indian Subcontinent, between the Eastern Ghats and the Bay of Bengal of the Indian Ocean.
1065Coming Soon!Detailsvan Keulen, Johannes1753
Scarce Dutch Chart of Kayalpatnam, India
van Keulen, Johannes
1753
$350.00van-Keulen--JohannesScarce-Dutch-Chart-of-Kayalpatnam--IndiaScarce antique "secret" coastal chart of "Cayl" ( Kayalpatnam ) on the Gulf of Mannar, near the southern end of the Coromandel Coast (Tamil Nadu) that had long been prosperous from maritime trade and pearl fishing. The area was conquered by the Portuguese in 1548, and taken over by the VOC in 1658. Prior to that time Kayal is referred to in Marco Polo's travel diaries dating to 1250 AD. Kayal was an important trading port dating to the 1st century A.D. <br></br> The chart identifies Dutch settlements / churches in the area of <b>Kayalpatnam</b>: Warande Patnam, Ould Cayl, Tolhuys, and Groote Kerk van Pt. Cayl, several topped by the Dutch flag. Insert elevation view facing west of the coast line. The seas feature detailed nautical information, including bathymetric soundings and the locations of sandbars and other navigation hazards. <br></br> From the sixth part of van Keuelen's "<b>de Nieuwe Groote Lichtende Zee-Fakkel</b>" based on secret charts of the <b>Dutch East India Company</b> (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie or <b>VOC</b>). Prior to the mid-18th century these charts were only disseminated in manuscript to safeguard what the VOC considerd to be proprietary trade secrets. The Dutch East India Company was the dominant trade force in Asia for nearly 200 years. <br></br> Bears the attribution at bottom: "In't ligt gebragt door Joannes van Keulen".
1086Coming Soon!Detailsvan Keulen, Johannes1753
Scarce Dutch Chart of Tuticorin, India
van Keulen, Johannes
1753
$350.00van-Keulen--JohannesScarce-Dutch-Chart-of-Tuticorin--IndiaScarce antique "secret" coastal chart of the port town of "Tutucoryn" ( <b>Tuticorin</b> or Thoothukudi ) on the Gulf of Mannar, near the southern end of the Coromandel Coast (Tamil Nadu) that has long been prosperous from pearl fishing. Tutucoryn was the seat of the Portuguese during the 16th century, and the Dutch occupied the area in the 17th century, when this chart was first drawn. <br></br> The chart identifies just one Dutch settlement- <b>Tutucoryn</b> shown flying the Dutch flag. Smaller bay on the mainland is labeled : "Oude Timmerwerf" - translated: "the old carpenters yard", from the looks of the area probably an area when the VOC ships were careened and repaired. <br></br> The seas feature detailed nautical information, including bathymetric soundings and the locations of sandbars and other navigation hazards including two small islands offshore: Polanis Eyland" and "Hasen Eyland". A large sandbank surrounding the islands carries the warning: <div class="indenttextblock"> "Dese Coraalsteene Rif ley in't midden altyd boven dog is mits de harde Wind nog op't naauwkeurigste niet gemeten. " </div> </br> From the sixth part of van Keuelen's "<b>de Nieuwe Groote Lichtende Zee-Fakkel</b>" based on secret charts of the <b>Dutch East India Company</b> (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie or <b>VOC</b>). Prior to the mid-18th century these charts were only disseminated in manuscript to safeguard what the VOC considerd to be proprietary trade secrets. The Dutch East India Company was the dominant trade force in Asia for nearly 200 years. <br></br> Bears the attribution at bottom: "In't ligt gebragt door Joannes van Keulen".
1210Coming Soon!DetailsDalrymple, Alexander1772
Chart of the Northern Part of The Bay of Bengal
Dalrymple, Alexander
1772
$300.00Dalrymple--AlexanderChart-of-the-Northern-Part-of-The-Bay-of-BengalRare English sea chart, covering the mouth of the Ganges River and surrounding areas, by Alexander Dalrymple. Includes the population centers of Kolkata ("Calcutta") and Chittagong ("Islamabad") and the Chittagong Coast. <br></br> List of references at upper right of the chart contains a listing of islands, rivers, and creeks between Sagor and Chittagong. <br></br> Includes very extensive depth extensive soundings in fathoms. Arrows indicate the directions of strongest part of the flood-tide; Roman numbers show the high and low tides. <br></br> Published by Alexander Dalrymple on 15 September, 1772 "According to an Act of Parliament." In his doctoral thesis Cook wrote of Dalrymple that he was: <div class="indenttextblock"> "now generally regarded as the originator of official British hydrography… was cumulatively a private publisher of nautical charts and plans (from 1767), the 'examiner of ships' journals' and chart publisher for the East India Company (from 1779), and Hydrographer to the Admiralty (from 1795)". </div> <br> <div class="indenttextblock">Reference: Cook, Andrew S., <b>Alexander Dalrymple (1737 - 1808) Hydrographer to the East India Company and to the Admiralty; as publisher: A Catalogue of Books and Charts. </b> Vol. 3 .Doctoral Thesis, University of St. Andrews. 1992.</div>
421Coming Soon!DetailsMalham, John1797
A Correct Chart of the Indian Ocean engraved for Malham's Naval Gazetteer
Malham, John
1797
$175.00Malham--JohnA-Correct-Chart-of-the-Indian-Ocean-engraved-for-Malham-s-Naval-GazetteerScarce chart showing the Indian Ocean, Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal. From the first American edition of Malham's Naval Gazetteer, published by Spotswood and Nancrede in Boston during September 1796. Vol 2.<BR> </BR> This chart comes from an early nautical gazetteer produced first in England and after 1796 in Boston, Massachusetts. Coverage includes the Persian Gulf, Maldive Islands, Andaman Island, and Nicobar Islands. With three sets of rhumb lines. Rev. John Malham was a prolific Yorkshire-born author. Malham died near London in 1807. Archivally matted.<BR> </BR>
833Coming Soon!DetailsJames Imray and Son1868
West Coast of India from Kanyakumari (Cape Comorin) to Mumbai (Bombay)
James Imray and Son
1868
$1,800.00James-Imray-and-SonWest-Coast-of-India-from--Kanyakumari-(Cape-Comorin)-to-Mumbai-(Bombay)Scarce antique blueback nautical chart of the West coast of India, including Mumbai ( Bombay ) and Goa, trending southward to Kanyakumari ( Cape Comorin ). Cape Comorin is the southern-most point of the Indian subcontinent, surrounded by the Laccadive Sea. This scarce nineteeth-century blueback nautical chart contains detailed inset port plans of Cochin Harbor, Calicut Roads, Bombay Harbor, and the Approach to Bombay. <br></br> During the 1800's there was a trend toward publication of very large small-scale charts with large-scale insets of key passages and harbors. The practice was adopted as much for economics as any other reason. James Imray and Son was one of a handful of British publishers who specialized in these charts which were often backed with canvas or linen cloth or heavy blue paper in order to help them withstand the frequent use and abuse aboard ship, hence the term "blueback chart". <br></br>Due to changing conditions charts could become outdated quickly and it was important for mariners to understand the accuracy of their navigational charts. The British Admiralty and later the U.S. Coast Survey responded by recording the dates of each update on the map, in some cases maintaining a historical record of updates spanning many decades. Private publishers of sea charts like Imray or Laurie fulfilled the same need by providing the date of the last update with an inked overstamp. On this chart we find an example of that practice, an oval-shaped blue ink over-stamp that reads: "Imray and Son 1869". <br></br> Published by James Imray and Son, 89 and 102 Minories. Laid to blue paper for protection with cloth selvage. Original cloth map ties. Yellow label from the Imray firm attached on verso that reads "James Imray and Son, Hydrographers.". James Imray and Son is one of the three firms that over the last two centuries combined to form Imray Laurie Norie & Wilson Ltd.