Thematic Maps

 Thumbnail CreatorDateTitle / Author / Date / LocationPrice  Description
835Coming Soon!DetailsDupain Triel, Jean-Louis1781
Antique thematic map of French rivers and canals
Dupain Triel, Jean-Louis
1781
LOC:
$3,000.00Dupain-Triel--Jean-LouisAntique-thematic-map-of-French-rivers-and-canalsA large and rare antique thematic map of the rivers, streams, and canals of France with a very fine decorative cartouche. First and only edition. In two un-joined sheets. 36" W x 37" H when joined. Very decorative title cartouche with illustration of a late 18th century river barge with a large rudder; the size probably was necessitated by a small turning angle limited to the width of the barge cabin just aft of amidships. Possibly influenced by Sanson's 1641 "Carte des rivières de la France, curieusement recherchée" but Dupain-Triel's waterways map is much larger and contains greater detail. <br></br> Une grande et rare carte thématique antique des rivières, ruisseaux et canaux de France avec un très beau cartouche décoratif. Première et unique édition. Dans deux feuilles non jointes. 36 "L x 37" H une fois joint. Cartouche titre très décorative avec illustration d'une barge fluviale. Peut-être influencé par 1641 "Carte des rivières de la France de Sanson, curieusement recherchée" mais la carte des cours d'eau Dupain-Triel est beaucoup plus grande et contient plus de détails. <br></br> Both sheets of a 2 sheet map (not joined) of France by J.L. Dupain-Triel Sr. Rare, only one holding listed in OCLC/World Cat. Only two sales recorded in the AMPR. <br></br> In 1782 Dupain-Triel paid for the typesetting and engraving of a manuscript by Marcellin du Carla that proposed the use of contour lines as a means of adding elevation information to terrestrial maps and Dupain-Triel Sr. is distinguished as the maker of the first contour map of France in 1791, based on du Carla's method. This thematic map is noteworthy in that it does not contain any contour information although it is clear that when the map was published Dupain Triel Sr. had strong interest in the topic. (Konvitz, Joseph. "Cartography in France, 1660-1848: Science, Engineering, and Statecraft". University of Chicago Press. 1987. pp. 76-80.)
568Coming Soon!DetailsPonce, Nicolas. and Godefroy, Francois.1784
Époques de l'établissement des Européens dans les États Unis
Ponce, Nicolas. and Godefroy, Francois.
1784
LOC:3
$375.00Ponce--Nicolas--and-Godefroy--Francois-Époques-de-l-établissement-des-Européens-dans-les-États-UnisOne of the earliest available United States post-Revolutionary War population thematic maps, ca. 1784. Tabulates the population of the U.S. by state/territory. <br></br> Shaded geographic areas on this original antique map show the Northeast United States and the extent of the original territories of Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina west to the Mississippi River. The shaded areas are tied back to a population table at left that shows the population for each territory. States and territories at the time of publication totaled a meager 3,119,676 persons, just 1% of the total population in 2013. This tabulation pre-dates the first official census that was conducted in 1790. In that earliest census the population was estimated at 3.92 million.<br></br> At right the major ports for each state are identified and at bottom the authors provide a brief history for each state. All area west of the Mississippi River is labeled "Louisiane".<br></br> French map published in Paris c. 1784. Source: "Collection d'estampes représentant les évenemens de la guerre, pour la liberté de l'Amérique Septentionale".
1457Coming Soon!DetailsGold, Joyce1804
Chart of the Supposed Course of the Florida Stream
Gold, Joyce
1804
LOC:3
$400.00Gold--JoyceChart-of-the-Supposed-Course-of-the-Florida-StreamGraphically arresting thematic chart of the "Florida Stream" or Gulf Stream with its flow northwards up the east coast of the United States, well past Bermuda, and then into the North Atlantic Ocean. Direction of the Gulf Stream current is shown visually by arrows supplemented with written notations indicating the compass direction at several locations across the stream. <br></br> The map may be considered to be an example of persuasive cartography. The concept of the Gulf Stream was novel at that time (hence the "supposed"); many mariners had not fully adopted the notion when this map was published. The direction and flow of the Gulf Stream was proposed by Benjamin Franklin in 1770 based on measurements he took during voyages from the U.S. to England and France. <br></br> London Published May 31, 1804 by J. Gold, 103 Shoe Lane.