ALL ITEMS: 'Batson--E--Bert


 Thumbnail CreatorDateTitle / Author / Date / LocationPrice  Description
5168Cyanotype Map Sable Island Graveyard with shipwrecks.DetailsBatson, E. Bert1948
Cyanotype Map Sable Island Graveyard of the Atlantic Shipwrecks
Batson, E. Bert
1948
LOC:
$0.00Batson--E--BertCyanotype-Map-Sable-Island-Graveyard-of-the-Atlantic-Shipwrecks<a href="https://www.rarecharts.com/ShowDetail/Creator/Batson--E--Bert/Title/Sable-Island-Canada-Map-Graveyard-of-Atlantic-Shipwrecks-Cyanotype/5404" target="_blank">This chart is SOLD but see another example of the Sable Island chart in our inventory.</a> <br></br> Interesting, original cyanotype map "Sable Island Graveyard on the Atlantic Shipwrecks Since 1800", sold by E. Bert Batson, but after a design by Donald S. Johnson, a member of the Sable Island Lifeboat Organization.
5404Cyanotype Map Sable Island Graveyard with shipwrecks.DetailsBatson, E. Bert1948
Sable Island Canada Map Graveyard of Atlantic Shipwrecks Cyanotype
Batson, E. Bert
1948
LOC:
$600.00Batson--E--BertSable-Island-Canada-Map-Graveyard-of-Atlantic-Shipwrecks-CyanotypeScarce, original cyanotype chart <strong>"Sable Island, Graveyard on the Atlantic, Shipwrecks Since 1800"</strong>, sold by E. Bert Batson, but after a design by Donald S. Johnson, a member of the Sable Island Lifeboat Organization. Copyrighted by R. Ian McDonald; in Canada 1938; in U.S.A. June 1948. Only one holding in WorldCat. This is only the second example of Batson's chart we have offered in ten years. <br></br> In 1916 E. Bert Batson started in Halifax, Nova Scotia as a junk dealer after a varied career as a soldier, sailor, and bank messenger. Batson bought from estate and Admiralty sales, auctions and other secondhand sources, selling his wares from a location on the Halifax waterfront, later moving to 36-38 Lower Water Street. His motto was <b>"Everything from a needle to an anchor."</b><br></br> <img src="/zoomifyimages/SC_5404/BertBatson.gif" alt="Bert Batson's store in Halifax, Nova Scotia." width="240" align="center" style="margin: 0px 0px"> <br></br> Here's a few paragraphs from a 1946 profile of Bert from Maclean's magazine: <div class="indenttextblock"> You may know of Bert. A lot of people do. He’s the “Needle To An Anchor” man. His store on Lower Water Street in Halifax is a fabulous place. Broadly speaking, it’s a secondhand store; but actually it’s a combination junk yard, ship chandler’s, department store, antique dealer’s, curio collector’s heaven and commission broker’s. It’s a store that has gained world-wide fame for its claim that it contains everything you can’t find elsewhere. Its customers include shipping men, souvenir hunters, antique collectors and a lot of other people in America and Europe and everybody in Halifax. And it’s likely to sell them anything from secondhand rolled oats, discarded gold mines, kidney pills or unmarketable fish, to shower curtains, ship’s lanterns, conveyer belts, Epsom salts and used bathtubs. </br> (Online: O'Hearn, D. P. Maclean's Magazine, November 15, 1946.) </div>